weighted-TA by dudleyredhead on Flickr.https://www.flickr.com/photos/dudleyredhead/15203360408/

weighted-TA by dudleyredhead on Flickr.

1 note Reblog collage

blastedheath:

Frank Nitsche (German, b. 1964), WD II, 1998. Oil on canvas, 149.9 x 140 cm.

blastedheath:

Frank Nitsche (German, b. 1964), WD II, 1998. Oil on canvas, 149.9 x 140 cm.

38 notes Reblog frank nitsche painting art

erinokeefeart:

cha cha  Erin O’Keefe

erinokeefeart:

cha cha  Erin O’Keefe

66 notes Reblog art photography

tndra:

Otto Zitko
Untitled, 2013
Enamel on aluminium

tndra:

Otto Zitko

Untitled, 2013

Enamel on aluminium

(via exites)

5,702 notes Reblog art otto zitko

wure:

v174

wure:

v174

93 notes Reblog art illustration

ayanvillafuerte:

pray.*first day high.

ayanvillafuerte:

pray.

*first day high.

24 notes Reblog photography black and white

magictransistor:

John Tunnard, Reclamation, 1966. Oil and gouache on board.

magictransistor:

John Tunnard, Reclamation, 1966. Oil and gouache on board.

(Source: tate.org.uk, via blastedheath)

164 notes Reblog john tunnard reclamation art painting

Reblog bootsonboots MERCY alternative music

biocanvas:

Inner ear of a mouse
One of the most common genetic defects in human deafness is the disappearance of an important family of proteins: the claudins. Claudins are the most critical component of tight junctions (shown here in blue), the place where two adjacent cells meet. Imagine a tight circle of people linking arms to protect what’s inside; tight junctions are what protect a tissue from unwanted molecules or cells trying to pass through. When mice cannot make claudin, the tight junctions in the cochlea (the spiral-shaped portion of the inner ear) are disrupted, robbing them of their hearing sensitivity.
Image by Dr. Alexander Gow and Cherie Southwood, Wayne State University.

biocanvas:

Inner ear of a mouse

One of the most common genetic defects in human deafness is the disappearance of an important family of proteins: the claudins. Claudins are the most critical component of tight junctions (shown here in blue), the place where two adjacent cells meet. Imagine a tight circle of people linking arms to protect what’s inside; tight junctions are what protect a tissue from unwanted molecules or cells trying to pass through. When mice cannot make claudin, the tight junctions in the cochlea (the spiral-shaped portion of the inner ear) are disrupted, robbing them of their hearing sensitivity.

Image by Dr. Alexander Gow and Cherie Southwood, Wayne State University.

(Source: microscopyu.com)

622 notes Reblog science hearing deafness biology art

thecomicsvault:

"TELL TALE COMIC STRIP BALLOONS"
Art by Bob Clarke
Words by Don Edwing 
MAD Magazine #160 (July 1973)

(via thebristolboard)

4,528 notes Reblog comic bob clarke don edwing